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Are there any encryption schemes where more than one key give the same encryption and decryption operations?

Given an encryption scheme that takes as input a key $k$ and converts it to an encryption operation $E$ via the function $M(k) = E$, is it possible that more than one $k$ can give the same $E$?

For example, let $k$ and $k’$ be two distinct keys. Is it possible that $M(k) = M(k’) = E$. In this sense, the mapping from the ‘key space’ to the ‘encryption operation space’ is surjective.

It doesn’t seem like it would be a vulnerability or flaw me given the number of different possible encryption operators given by the scheme is large enough, and that each distinct encryption operator is mapped onto by roughly the same number of keys. For instance, let’s say the key space for a given key of length $n$ is $2^n$, but the corresponding encryption operation space is of size $2^{frac{n}{2}}$. For large values of $n$, although a given key would have many ‘collisions’ (other keys that give the same encryption operator), the protocol could still be secure.

How do my contracts in one .sol file deploy correctly? And how to verify on etherscan?

Ok so I have multiple contracts in one .sol file. Specifically I have 4 contracts: 2 of them are the "main" contracts and the other 2 are kind of like "helper" contracts inherited into the other 2 "main" contracts. I have also imported 2 OpenZeppelin contracts that are also being inherited into the other 2::Listen

Ok so I have multiple contracts in one .sol file. Specifically I have 4 contracts: 2 of them are the "main" contracts and the other 2 are kind of like "helper" contracts inherited into the other 2 "main" contracts. I have also imported 2 OpenZeppelin contracts that are also being inherited into the other 2 "main" contracts.

Anyways, so I only go ahead and deploy the 2 "main" contracts and they work fine. They are even utilizing the other 2 "helper" contracts that I did not specifically deploy but I guess they also get deployed along with the other 2 "main" contracts since they are being inherited? This is where I am confused on how that works…can someone give an explanation?

So now the real pickle is that I am unsure of how to verify & publish the smart contracts on etherscan. I’ve already deployed them onto the Ropsten network but am always running into issues when trying to verify & publish them. Since they are originally all in one file, if I wanted to verify the 1st "main" contract, do I just leave out the other 2nd "main" contract from the file when verifying and vice versa?

Also, how to deal with the imported Openzeppelin contracts when trying to verify?

Any help would be appreciated.

Are there any encryption schemes where more than one key give the same encryption and decryption operations?

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